TRANSFER PROCEDURES

Our goal is to teach the child in a way that he will consistently be successful. One way to do this is to provide full prompts and gradually fade the prompts. Another way to do this is to use transfer procedures.


Transfer

Think of transfer as taking a response that a child can already produce in one situation and teaching him to produce the same or similar response in another situation. Any time you want to teach a skill, think about the conditions under which the child can produce the same or similar response and use that response as a starting point. The child is more likely to repeat the same behavior or say the same word if he just previously did so. Gradually add "distance" between the responses until the child can respond to the new SD alone. Some examples of transfers might include:


1.  The child can imitate you clapping and you want to teach him to respond to the SD "clap".

Instructor: "Do this?" and claps hand R= child claps

Instructor: "clap" and claps hands. R= child claps

Instructor: "clap" R= child claps

The response of clapping is now under the control of the SD "clap"


2.  The child can mand for a car and you want to teach him to tact "car". A variety of different transfers can be used.

   a)  Show him the car

Instructor: "What's this?" R=car

Instructor: "What do you want?" R= car (At this point there is joint control mand/tact) Gradually add other tasks between the tact of the car and mand for the car.

   b)  Have 2 items for which the child has strong mands available. Determine the item for which the child has the strongest EO by allowing him to mand for each item.

Instructor: "What's this?" R= tacts less preferred item

Instructor: "What do you want?" R= mands preferred item.

   c)  Receptive to Tact Transfer- Have pictures available of the items for which the child consistently mands.

Instructor: "Touch the " R= touches named item.

Instructor: "What's this?" R= Child names item. (I typically provide full-prompts for the tact until the child is spontaneously tacting as he receptively identifies the item.

  d)  Echo to tact transfer-

Instructor: "Say car" R= "car"

Instructor: "What's this?" R= "Car"

3. The child can tact a "car" but cannot tact it when given a feature, function or class.

Instructor: What's this? R= Car

Instructor: Which one does mommy drive? R= Car


4. The child is able to follow simple instructions to perform actions and you want to teach him to tact actions.

Instructor: Clap R= claps

Instructor: What are you doing? Clapping R= clapping (full prompt because the "form" is different)

Instructor: What are you doing? R= clapping.

5. The child is able to fill-in responses and you want to teach him to answer questions.

Instructor: " We sleep in a " R= Bed

Instructor: What do we sleep in? R= Bed


6.  The child is able to respond when asked "What do we sleep in?" but only if the picture is present and you want to teach him to respond intraverbally (no picture present).

Instructor: (With picture of bed present) What do we sleep in? R = BedInstructor (removes picture from view) What do we sleep in? R= Bed.

7.  The child is able to respond with the object name in a fill in task but is not able to respond with the associated action (function), parts (features), adjectives (features) or class (category) in a fill in task.

Instructor: We sleep in a.. (bed). A bed is where we.. R= Sleep

Instructor: Something with wheels is a.. R= car Inst: A car has R= wheels (can also transfer)


T. Vail 7/02

 

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